Extending Your Garden Season: September Workshop 2015

What does "Season Extension" mean to you?

As Mike Nolan asked each group member we listened to responses and it emerged that 'Season Extension', through a variety of methods, is the quest to eat foods out of season

(Post Contents: Heat, Light, and Not Working TOO Hard)

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Blueberry and Garlic Planting: September Workday 2015

In our culture of instantaneous gratification we often have to remind ourselves that most good things take time. This is something that we gardeners get the chance to practice often.

We are putting in the prep work now for our Food Forest, including a blueberry patch, which we will harvest from for many years to come. And also planting our garlic plot.

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Volunteers Needed! Learn how to freeze produce!

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Mushroom Foray for Culinary Arts Students

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The Gift Model: September Workday 2015

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How often do you give without any expectation of reciprocation? We all have needs like food, water, shelter, love and friendship, recreation for which many of us might be willing to barter, exchanging goods or services, but bartering still involves an upfront exchange, you give something and you get something. The Gift Model takes it a step further: you give your time, talents, and things as generously as you can without assumption of receiving something back and because others do the same your needs are met as well. 

Living in the current economy and culture that we do trying to live the gift model sounds brave to me, you are putting a lot of trust into other people. Nick and Heather Bartow are the brave souls who are living the gift model right here in our own community.

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American Community Gardening Conference 2015

The thing about community gardens is that they come in seemingly infinite forms.

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Chatfield Farms run by Denver Botanic Gardens is a 5-acre working farm

This August 2015 The Garden Project staff Sandhya Tillotson (Executive Director), Brooke Frazer (Manna Garden Manager), and Mia Carrasco-Songer (Ohana Kuleana Community Garden) headed to Denver for the 36th Annual National Conference on Community Gardening hosted by the American Community Gardening Association (ACGA) and Denver Urban Gardens (DUG) in the phenomenal Denver Botanic Gardens.

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A once in a lifetime experience:

Sandhya, Brooke, and Mia with the infamous Corpse Flower,
a 5ft tall flower which only blooms once every 8-20 years and releases a foul odor.
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9th Annual Tour de Farms 2015

We celebrated the 9th Annual Tour de Farms, a bike tour highlighting what is unique, healthy and homegrown in our agricultural and gardening community.

Historically hosted by Growing Partners and CSU Extension, this year The Garden Project was honored to organize the tour with CSU Extension. The tour was sold out for both the short and long routes and we had over 100 folks participate!

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New School Garden Educator

Meet our new AmeriCorps School Garden Coordinator!

 

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Wild Wisdom of Weeds Workshop 2015

After trekking almost 100 miles, over 8 mountain passes Katrina Blair found her way back to Durango to teach us a little bit about the wealth of food hiding in the cracks of our sidewalks - or in between our garden beds. We often call these plants weeds, but we soon learned there was more to them than just pesky adversaries trying to choke out our tomatoes.OKCG_WS_-_Wild_Wisdom_of_Weeds_8.17.15_Pics-022_long.15_Pics-023.JPG

Katrina was returning from the annual Telluride Mushroom Festival that she walks to every year from Durango to teach about wild plants. She carries only light camping gear and a knife and lives off the plants she is able to find on her hike. She said this year the wild strawberries were delicious and abundant, and she returned from her foray feeling more in tune with this wonderful place where we live.

When I look at my cupboards and refrigerator full of store bought food it seems like a daunting task to feed myself from the weeds I usually pull and throw in my compost. But Katrina gave us different glasses with which to look at the world, ones with which the dandelions transform into pesto, the giant hollyhock leaves into burrito wraps, and the thistle into a delicious chai tea. Suddenly my weedy backyard has transformed into a tasty, wild kitchen.

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Celebrating Youth at Manna

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